Exploring tide gauges long sea level records for ocean and climate studies

Author: Sergey Vinogradov and Rui M. Ponte
Date: 
March 2, 2008 - March 7, 2008
Type: 
Presentation
Venue: 
Meetings below:
Citation: 

Vinogradov, S. V., and R. M. Ponte, 2008, Exploring tide gauges long sea level records for ocean and climate studies. ASLO/TOS/AGU/ERF Ocean Sciences Meeting 2008, Orlando, FL, March 2-7 2008.

Vinogradov, S.V., and R.M. Ponte, 2008. Exploring tide gauge long sea level records for ocean and climate studies, AGU Ocean Sciences Meeting, Orlando, March 2008.

Tide gauges provide unique in-situ measurements of monthly and longer period sea level variability going back many decades, but all records are confined to coastal and island locations. To make best use of these long tide gauge records in ocean modeling and assimilation efforts, it is essential to understand how representative they are of the large-scale sea level variability over the deep ocean. An attempt to address this issue is made using detailed comparisons of tide gauge variability with that observed by satellite altimeters for the last 15 years, taking advantage of their near-global spatial coverage, and also with a number of different model simulations. Tide gauge/altimeter/model differences are explored as a function of location, temporal and spatial scale, model resolution and physical parameterizations, etc., with the goal of being able to extract maximum information from the tide gauge records. Analyses include the provision of error estimates that might be used to appropriately weight tide gauge data when using them as constraints in ocean climate models of the last century.

This topic was presented at two different venues:

Vinogradov, S. V., and R. M. Ponte, 2008, Exploring tide gauges long sea level records for ocean and climate studies. ASLO/TOS/AGU/ERF Ocean Sciences Meeting 2008, Orlando, FL, March 2-7 2008.

Vinogradov, S.V., and R.M. Ponte, 2008. Exploring tide gauge long sea level records for ocean and climate studies, AGU Ocean Sciences Meeting, Orlando, March 2008.