MSX Satellite observations of thunderstorm-generated gravity waves in mid-wave infrared images of the upper straosphere

Author: Michael J. Kendra, William Gallery, E. M. Dewan, R. H. Picard, R. R. O'Neil, H. A. Gardiner, J. Gibson, J. D. Mill and E. Richards
Date: 
June 14, 1998
Type: 
Journal Article
Venue: 
Geophysical Research Letters
Citation: 

Dewan, E. M., R. H. Picard, R. R. O'Neil, H. A. Gardiner, J. Gibson, J. D. Mill, E. Richards, M. Kendra, and W. O. Gallery (1998), MSX satellite observations of thunderstorm‐generated gravity waves in mid‐wave infrared images of the upper stratosphere, Geophys. Res. Lett., 25(7), 939-942.

Data from the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) has provided the first observations of thunderstorm‐generated gravity waves imaged from space. Gravity wave theory predicts that isolated, sufficiently convective thunderstorms can launch waves and create a unique intensity pattern of concentric circles on a radiating surface of constant altitude above such a storm. Among the MSX constant‐nadir‐angle mid‐wave infrared (MWIR) observations, two instances of such patterns have been identified. It was confirmed from meteorological satellite images that highly convective isolated thunderstorms occurred at the locations and times expected.